Group Homes

homepage2With four group homes licensed as Residential Care Facilities for the Chronically Ill (RCFCI), we operate the longest-running assisted living programs for people living with HIV/AIDS in Los Angeles County. Casa Los Angeles is in the Pico-Crenshaw area, Casa Madona is near Downtown Los Angeles, and Soldano House and Casa de Corazon are in Long Beach.

Under the direction of on-site residence managers, homes are staffed around the clock by caring, bilingual/bicultural certified nursing assistants (CNAs) trained to handle medical emergencies and supervise the daily care of our residents. CNAs also clean and disinfect the homes and prepare nutritionally balanced, HIV-specific meals that accommodate the complex requirements of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A nurse case management team (registered nurse and social worker-MSW) provides on-site medical, nursing and social services. For services not provided on site, residents are linked with outside providers.

History PageDesigned exclusively for single women and women with children, Casa Madona is the only AIDS-housing facility of its kind in California. It exists to keep families together and assists mothers, whenever possible, in reunification with their children. More than half of Casa Madona’s residents have children.

The group homes serve as an essential stepping stone to assist clients that are homeless or too sick to care for themselves to receive care they desperately need to receive medical attention and transition to stable housing. Since 1987, the group homes have housed more than 600 persons living below the poverty line with HIV/AIDS.

Patrick’s Story

Sober for 19 years, Patrick became disabled with HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C and was compelled to retire from his job. He said “I was alone, couch-bound with agoraphobia, and falling apart financially.” He had not reacted well to multi-viral medical treatments. When his rent check bounced and banking fees compounded, he faced homelessness and escalating anxiety. After interviews, he was accepted into our group home program which provides 24/7 care. Patrick completed a year-long IV therapy of interferon to treat his Hepatitis C. He also learned to use a computer at a local school. After receiving the care and support he needed to regain his health, confidence and hope for a future, he left the group home and is now living independently and is self-sufficient. “Every day I wake up and say thank you for my new life.”